Action, HK Style – My Young Auntie (1981)

Director: Lau Kar-leung
Starring: Kara Hui Ying-Hung, Lau Kar-leung, Hsiao Ho, Johnny Wang Lung-Wei, Yuen Tak, Gordon Liu Chia-Hui

After doing a favour for his dying master by marrying him to keep his property out the hands of his evil brother (Wang Lung-Wei), Jing Dai-Nan (Kara Hui) has to flee to the house of one of his brothers Yu Jing-Chuen (Lau Kar-leung) who she is now the “auntie” of despite being many years younger. His son Charlie (Hsiao Ho) is meant to be in Hong Kong studying, but arrives back early and ends up fighting with Dai-Nan and trashing the joint.

Cue many understandings and temper tantrums from both Charlie and Dai-Nan. When they both settle down Charlie takes her into town, where she gets made fun of for being a “country bumpkin” and ends up in a much too fancy dress, leading to another fight where they have to run from the cops.

Even though Dai-Nan seems to hate fun, Charlie is determined to show her a good time and after a quick musical interlude invites her to a dance. Unfortunately the dance is interrupted by the cronies of the evil brother “don’t worry Charlie, in Hong Kong we always fight at parties” and Charlie and Dai-Nan end up getting arrested. It was all a ruse to get the old man’s will and deeds back so Dai-Nan has to sign them over.

Assessing the situation and asking for the help of the other uncles, Dai-Nan decides to act on her own with Charlie tagging along to find the traps. Unfortunately they fail and Dai-Nan gets kidnapped. Will they get out of this bind or not? I’ll let you find out.

Phew! The synopsis does not tell you how crazy this movie is, with some fourth wall breaking shenanigans, many crazy cross culture exchanges, the dance sequence in western costumes, Gordon Lui in ridiculous hair, the dude with the sunglasses who never loses them no matter how many times he gets beat up and many other silly things.

You have to be in the right mood to see this as if you are expecting a serious kung fu movie you will dismiss it out of hand. I saw it on a double bill with Dirty Ho and on the tail end of seeing eight Hong Kong movies in a weekend at a special screening so I was ready for it. I almost cheered when Wang Lung-Wei pointed and there is even an almost a POV point at one point.

Not sure why they could not let the Young Auntie have the final fight scene to herself, she does not look like she needs rescuing the other times. Despite that, it is a funny movie and while not an essential watch worth having a look for if you want to see a movie similar to Lady is the Boss.

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